Evolving Nonsense and Stuff

Dirty Irish

59 notes

flikkerlicht:

Mickey Mouse Gasmasks from WWII

On December 7, 1941, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Hawaii with massive force that destroyed the battleships of the Pacific Fleet. A critical need existed to protect the civilian population, especially children, from gas attacks.

On January 7th, 1942, one month after Pearl Harbor, T.W. Smith, Jr., the owner of the Sun Rubber Company, and his designer, Dietrich Rempel, with Walt Disney’s approval introduced a protective mask for children. 

The mask was designed so children would carry it and wear it as part of a game. This would reduce the fear associated with wearing a gas mask and hopefully, improve their wear time and, hence, survivability.

The protection of children was a primary concern of all nations during World War II. The Mickey Mouse Gas Mask was designed for small children in a valiant attempt to give them something that would work and still be fun. Ultimately, the Office of Civil Defense bought the M2 Noncombatant Gas Mask for small children to protect them from chemical agents. In tests, with proper coaching and good salesmanship by the leader, young children could be induced to wear the gas mask for extended periods.

The Mickey Mouse Gas Mask was produced as part of the war production program. The Sun Rubber Company produced approximately 1,000 Mickey Mouse gas masks and earned an Army-Navy ‘E’ for excellence in wartime production in 1944.

Very few of the Mickey Mouse gas masks survived. The US Army Chemical Museum at Fort McClellan, Alabama, has a hand-made prototype. The 45th Infantry Division Museum, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, has a production specimen on permanent display with other gas masks in the combat support area of the museum. The Walt Disney Archives, Burbank, California, has a facepiece without ears, lenses, or a canister, and a mask owned by the founder of the Sun Rubber Company was on display at the Summit County (Ohio) Historical Society’s “Toys Made in Summit County” exhibit in 1982. It is rumored a woman with a huge Mickey Mouse collection in Japan has one.

If a Mickey Mouse gas mask were to ever pop up for sale, there are a few who would gladly pay the more than US$2,000 to own one.

Source (2)

27 notes

celtic-studies:

The Witham Shield
Iron Age, 400-300 BC From the river Witham near Lincoln, England
The finest example of Early La Tène Celtic Art from Britain
This shield was made at the same time as the Chertsey Shield. In common with the Chertsey and also the Battersea Shield, the Witham Shield was found in a river. It was found in 1826 in the River Witham, near the village of Washingborough, outside the city of Lincoln. When the shield was first found, archaeologists could clearly see the shape of a wild boar on the front. In fact, the shape was cut from a piece of leather and fixed to the shield. The leather has rotted away, but its shadow remains as a different colour in the bronze. Today, the image of the boar has faded, but can still be seen if you look carefully. Small rivet holes across the centre of the shield show where the boar was fixed to the front.
This is not a complete shield. It is a decorative front fixed to a wooden back. The wooden back rotted away in the river long ago, just leaving the metal front. The decoration on the shield is one of the best examples of the way British craftspeople adopted the new style of La Tène art. The red colour on the shield’s boss are small pieces of red coral from the Mediterranean. Coral decoration was rare on objects made in Iron Age Britain. Usually, red glass was used, as on the Battersea Shield

celtic-studies:

The Witham Shield

Iron Age, 400-300 BC
From the river Witham near Lincoln, England

The finest example of Early La Tène Celtic Art from Britain

This shield was made at the same time as the Chertsey Shield. In common with the Chertsey and also the Battersea Shield, the Witham Shield was found in a river. It was found in 1826 in the River Witham, near the village of Washingborough, outside the city of Lincoln. When the shield was first found, archaeologists could clearly see the shape of a wild boar on the front. In fact, the shape was cut from a piece of leather and fixed to the shield. The leather has rotted away, but its shadow remains as a different colour in the bronze. Today, the image of the boar has faded, but can still be seen if you look carefully. Small rivet holes across the centre of the shield show where the boar was fixed to the front.

This is not a complete shield. It is a decorative front fixed to a wooden back. The wooden back rotted away in the river long ago, just leaving the metal front. The decoration on the shield is one of the best examples of the way British craftspeople adopted the new style of La Tène art. The red colour on the shield’s boss are small pieces of red coral from the Mediterranean. Coral decoration was rare on objects made in Iron Age Britain. Usually, red glass was used, as on the Battersea Shield

(Source: britishmuseum.org)

137 notes

Anonymous asked: I watched this documentary "Rise of the black wolf" and I have a few questions. There was a lone female with two grown pups, and when a stranger male wolf came, they became mates with the female and he "adopted" her already grown pups. He hunted for family and later he was hunting with female's sons as they were his own. My question is: does it happen in the wild? Male wolf adopting pups of a female or teaching them how to hunt, or was it only in the film and is not real? Thanks!

thecrow-thecorpse:

wolveswolves:

Yes, it does happen! When one of the parents die, usually another member of the pack replaces the deceased parent’s leading role. Often the replacing wolf is the same sex as the wolf that died, and will become the new mate of the remaining parent. If there aren’t any other adult pack members that can replace the role of the deceased parent, it often happens that the remaining parent looks for or accepts a new mate that isn’t from their pack – like in the documentary “Rise of black wolf”.

All wolves love cubs and are programmed to protect and nurture them. This can extend to pups that are not related to themselves, especially if the adopting wolf has pups of its own already. 

Also, there’s been studies done in which they followed wolf packs from who one of the breeding pair died. In those cases odd composed packs formed (for example two male wolves who were brothers and a new, unrelated female wolf who joined and paired with one of the brothers), but they all had in common a structure of a leading breeding pair. This studies concluded that apparently, wolves instinctively always seek for this structure in whatever unnatural group they end up or formed. 

(You can watch the documentary “Rise of black wolf” for free online here)

dirty-irish you might like the docu they’re talking about or movie. Not sure which it is, but anyway!

oooo…its one of the old nat geo movies :3 i loved those, back before “reality tv” was on all the channels >.< thecrow-thecorpse

61,394 notes

teppathekid:

leaper182:

This is one of my most favorite endings to a Disney movie, hands down.

Fuck the sword of a Hun who was going to destroy China. Fuck any sort of gift from the Emperor. They’re these *things* that have no meaning whatsoever.

His little girl is home from a *war*, safe and sound, and that is the most important thing in the world to him. The world can go to hell, but it doesn’t matter, because Mulan’s home.

this scene ALWAYS makes me cry

(Source: tomhazeldine, via doppel-ganger)